A Rare Goblin Shark Caught in the Gulf of Mexico for the Second Time

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Carl Moore, a commercial fisher who has been shrimping the Atlantic and the Gulf for 50 years, caught a goblin shark on April 19, 2014. The 63-year-old man landed the rare deep-sea shark at around 2,000 feet (610 meters) deep, about halfway through his 18-day fishing trip. He released this ichthyological wonder back to the depths of ocean after taking photos of it.

From the pictures, it’s estimated that the goblin shark Captain Carl Moore snagged is 4.5 meters long. The fearsome finned creature is thought to be a female shark and it’s believed to only the second goblin shark, on record, ever spotted in the Gulf of Mexico. The last one seen was in 2000. It lives primarily on a diet of fish and squid. The goblin shark's most distinguishing feature is its uniquely shaped head.

A goblin shark was caught by 63-year-old man Carl Moore in the Gulf of Mexico on April 19, 2-14. The captain let the animal go after he took some pictures of it. It was the second one spotted in the Gulf of Mexico. The species of deep-sea shark was last recorded by ocean researchers in 2000. (Photo credit: Carl Moore)

The goblin shark was caught by 63-year-old man Carl Moore in the Gulf of Mexico on April 19, 2-14. The captain let the shark go after he took some pictures of it. It was the second one spotted in the Gulf of Mexico. The species of deep-sea shark was last recorded by ocean researchers in 2000. (Photo credit: Carl Moore)

The goblin shark had an uniquely shaped head and its snout protruded like a trowel, making it perfect for investigating muddy ocean bottoms. Its teeth are shaped like long needles and act like knives, impaling and holding on to soft-bodied prey. (Photo credit: Carl Moore)

The goblin shark had an uniquely shaped head and its snout protruded like a trowel, making it perfect for investigating muddy ocean bottoms. Its teeth are shaped like long needles and act like knives, impaling and holding on to soft-bodied prey. (Photo credit: Carl Moore)

The rare deep-sea shark was discovered when captain Carl Moore was working about 10 miles off the coast of Key West, Florida. It was 4.5 meters or 15 feet long. The catch of the fish was an “important scientific discovery.” (Photo credit: Carl Moore)

The rare deep-sea shark was discovered when captain Carl Moore was working about 10 miles off the coast of Key West, Florida. It was 4.5 meters or 15 feet long. The catch of the fish was an “important scientific discovery.” (Photo credit: Carl Moore)

The goblin shark, which was well adapted for its deep-sea habitat, was referred to as “the ugliest living shark” by many people.

The goblin shark, which was well adapted for its deep-sea habitat, was referred to as “the ugliest living shark” by many people.

Related articles:

10,000 Mysterious Sharks Off Florida Coast

Swimming With White Sharks in Mexico’s Coast

Spectator Scene of Great White Sharks Hunting Seal in False Bay, South Africa

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Michael Hudgen has 268 articles online and 3 fans

Michael Hudgen is a 30-year-old expert in travel. He is also interested in other fields such as economy, science and society. He especially likes writing articles on economy related issues.

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A Rare Goblin Shark Caught in the Gulf of Mexico for the Second Time

This article was published on 2014/05/08
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