Ancient Aztec Capital beneath Modern Mexico City

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Mexican archaeologists have found that the tomb of an Aztec emperor lied beneath a recently excavated stone monolith showing a fearsome blood-drinking god. They also detected underground chambers, which were believed to contain the remains of Emperor Ahuizotl by using ground-penetrating radar. The discovery opened an extraordinary window into Aztec civilization and collected thousands of ancient items reflecting its life as well as outstanding incidents at that time. A series of photos such as the stone of earth goddess Tlaltecuhtli, the image of moon goddess Coyolxauhqui and various buried offerings will help readers partly know about the brilliant period of Aztec community.

 


Archaeologists used laser-driven pulses of light to produce a green 3-D image of this tomb and found out six offerings in an adjacent shaft

Archaeologists used laser-driven pulses of light to produce a green 3-D image of this tomb and found out six offerings in an adjacent shaft

 


A team of 30 technicians and two cranes in May took 15 hours to move the 12-ton stone of the earth goddess Tlaltecuhtli, which broken into four pieces and stood 500 feet high, from the excavation site to a new home in Mexico City\'s Templo Mayor Museum. The restoration process during two years and six months has traced original ocher, red, blue, white and black pigments of the andesite stone. But the monolith’s center still missed

A team of 30 technicians and two cranes in May spent 15 hours moving the 12-ton stone of the earth goddess Tlaltecuhtli, which was broken into four pieces and stood 500 feet high, from the excavation site to a new home in Mexico City\'s Templo Mayor Museum. The restoration process during two years and six months has traced original ocher, red, blue, white and black pigments of the andesite stone. But the monolith’s center still missed

 


The skeleton of one animal called Aristo-Canine wearing a seashell belt is on museum display

The skeleton of one animal called Aristo-Canine wearing a seashell belt is on museum display

 


Archaeologists, including Ángel González, have recovered thousands of artifacts, which help scholars decode Aztec view of the universe. The search for a royal tomb has moved to a new tunnel within the Templo Mayor excavation site in the heart of Mexico City

Archaeologists, including Ángel González, have recovered thousands of artifacts, which help scholars decode Aztec view of the universe. The search for a royal tomb has moved to a new tunnel within the Templo Mayor excavation site in the heart of Mexico City

 


Red, white and green lights illuminated the ruins of the Templo Mayor for visitors to see at night time visitors. Digs have revealed 13 phases of construction from 1375 to 1519

Red, white and green lights illuminated the ruins of the Templo Mayor for visitors to see at night time visitors. Digs have revealed 13 phases of construction from 1375 to 1519

 


The largest offering held shells, corals, a tiny pine mask, a sawfish bill, 8,500 animal bones, a jar of grain, a scepter and fire god sculptures

The largest offering contained shells, corals, a tiny pine mask, a sawfish bill, 8,500 animal bones, a jar of grain, a scepter and fire god sculptures

 


This tiny pine mask was discovered in offering 126

This tiny pine mask was discovered in offering 126

 


Archaeologists found offering box 125 inside the shaft beside the monolith. This gold ornament was among the treasures offered to the gods

Archaeologists found offering box 125 inside the shaft beside the monolith. This gold ornament was among the treasures offered to the gods

 


This greenstone necklace was found in offering 125

This greenstone necklace was found in offering 125

 


Flint and copal knives were also found inside offering box 125

Flint and copal knives were also found inside offering box 125

 


An image of the moon goddess Coyolxauhqui was at the foot of the Templo Mayor\'s steps. The stone, unearthed in 1978, recalled the legend of her murder by her brother, Aztec patron god Huitzilopochtli

An image of the moon goddess Coyolxauhqui was at the foot of the Templo Mayor\'s steps. The stone, unearthed in 1978, recalled the legend of her murder by her brother, Aztec patron god Huitzilopochtli

 


A stone image of fire god Xiuhtecuhtli (Turquoise Lord)

A stone image of fire god Xiuhtecuhtli (Turquoise Lord)

 

 

 

 

Related links:

Perfume in Ancient Greece

Zhaoling Tomb , an Ancient Wonder

4,300 year old pairs of tombs discovered

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Taylor Meyer has 332 articles online and 9 fans

I am the fan of news on society and culture. I am currently the lecturer in social major. In free time, I am fond of reading articles and joining social activities.

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Ancient Aztec Capital beneath Modern Mexico City

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This article was published on 2010/11/15